Products warranties and delivery

It’s also essential to set out clear terms on how your products can be purchased, any restrictions, and what happens if you cannot supply something.

Some stores include their warranty information as part of their Terms and Conditions, while others include a separate Warranty Policy.

Here’s an example from Myer in Australia on how they deal with orders for goods:

User Behaviour

  • Your supplier information, such as company name, place of registration, address for service, and tax details such as US Sales Tax ID number, or GST/VAT registration number
  • A link to your other policies (Privacy Policy, Returns and Refunds Policy, Cookies Policy)
  • Dispute Resolution information (e.g. arbitration, mediation)
  • Jurisdiction (applicable laws and the jurisdiction in which any Court claims can be made)
  • Details for sending notices

Payment Details

  • Payment details are another important clause to cover. Your store will most likely use a variety of payment methods, such as credit card, debit card, and PayPal. Some stores even allow direct deposit.No matter which payment methods you allow, your agreement should outline the different payment methods that you accept, when payment is required, what currency your prices are in, and any other information about payment details that you can provide your customers. This is to make sure that there is no confusion when your customers are paying for your products.

    Here’s another example from IndieCity

Intellectual Property

These clauses are important for ensuring that your intellectual property such as brands or trademarks are not misused in any way. Here’s another example from the terms of Apple iTunes showing their Intellectual Property clause:

Where to Display Aggrement

These clauses are important for ensuring that your intellectual property such as brands or trademarks are not misused in any way. Here’s another example from the terms of Apple iTunes showing their Intellectual Property clause: